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20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN 8
MSNBCW 6
MSNBC 5
CNBC 4
CSPAN2 3
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
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LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
down a little bit more during the course of 2013. but given the overall environment that we're in, the fact that securities are repricing at lower levels as we reinvest, the overall low rate of environment is not unusual. we do have offsets in our loan portfolio as our national strategic non-portfolio runs down or winds off. we have an opportunity to invest in higher yield customer oriented relationships, and so we think we've got some stabilizing forces. it's hard to tell exactly how the market reacted in one given day to our net interest margin. but we feel like we've had pretty good management of it and i'm optimistic we'll maintain some stability in a tough environment in 2013. >> your fee income did come in lower than expected, though, both capital markets and mortgage banking. is that just a one-time only? are we going to see a better series of numbers in 2013? >> well, yeah, capital markets is probably the big driver of any up or down movement in our fee income. the fourth quarter was an unusual quarter in a couple of ways. one, you had the impact of hurricane sandy where t
is to foster an environment where sexual assault is not tolerated, condoned or ignored. we must have a climate of dignity and respect with where where a victim's report is taken seriously x they're provided resources. commanders or and leaders across the armed forces play an essential role in establishing this climate where victims supported, and they do not fear retaliation, where offenders know they will be found and held accountable and where bystanders are motivated to intervene. our troops take care of each other on the battlefield, the same ethos of care must extend to combating sexual assault. commanders are responsible for the good order and discipline of the forces under them. this is essential to military readiness and mission success. removing commanders from the administration of military justice would undercut their ability to establish good order and discipline in their units and undercut their authority especially in combat where the uniform code of military justice is most tested by the stresses of war. the department has undertaken a variety of initiatives to strengthen our ef
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
who say that the sandy hook tragedy was a hoax. the real purpose was to create a political environment to take away all our guns. the american public is largely on board with at least some of the president's agenda. in a new nbc news/"wall street journal" poll, more than half, 56%, say laws covering the sale of firearms should be stricter. so what realistically can the president do? david corn is washington bureau chief for "mother jones," joy reid is managing editor of thegrio.com, and both are msnbc political analysts. joy, how large should he be looking? >> i think the president needs to go in with a large package obviously, but when you talk to individual lawmakers, particularly on the house side, you get the sense two things have to happen. first of all, something has to pass the senate. that theoretically could be large, but the house is going to be a much tougher sled, although i was speaking with a couple lawmakers yesterday who seemed to think parts of what the president wants could actually pass in the house. things that are pretty much noncontroversial, things like universal
above normal. and that's a huge increase in temperature in the marine environment. >> reporter: how could you characterize the shrimp stocks off the coast of maine today? >> in critical condition. >> reporter: critical? >> critical condition. >> reporter: patrick kelleher is the commissioner of the maine department of marine resources. it's his job to protect the fishery. so he and a committee took the step of limiting the shrimp catch to less than one and a half million pounds-- down 72% from last year. >> it takes a while for this population to catch back up. it's not a rosy picture at all. it's very difficult. very difficult for the managers, but it's a hell of a lot more difficult for the fishermen. >> reporter: the 300 shrimp traps that cost ronald pinkham $85 apiece may never make it out of his backyard this year. so if you're not out shrimping that's a couple people without work. >> three or four people without work. so it kind of snowballs down the line. with the restrictions on shrimping it may be that the only thing pinkham and colby catch this winter is a beautiful sunris
. it was a big grab bag, $787 billion of goodies that included many things for energy and the environment. i don't recall offhand the overall ratings for energy but i know a lot were included in the economic stimulus bill. host: is president obama making fewer promises that he was initially? guest: absolutely, the 2012 campaign was a campaign of attacks. when we look back at the moments of the campaign, as you look at the debates, what they were sitting on the campaign trail, what they were saying in commercials -- they spent some months of the time attacking each other and relatively little really laying out their agenda in any detail. particularly, mitt romney did not provide any details about his tax plan but even obama spent some much time attacking the romney that there were fewer promises made. there was less of an agenda. host: one last look at theobameter - he has made progress on 73% of his promises. thank you for being here this morning. coming up next is our regular america by the numbers segment where we will look at how american students are performing in schools and how they rank c
. what sort of environment are we looking at in terms of what assad might do next? >> it is extremely chaotic and unpredictable. because of the internationalization, much has been said this is part of war. with the money coming into it and the weapons, money from the gulf country to the rebels. it is a regional conflict. the fighting is taking place and has regional complications. >> chemical weapons. i believe his statement is he said earlier he is alluding to the chemical weapons and said it could involve u.s. troops saying you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved that they might ask for assistance in that situation. so defense secretary paneta discussing troops and the weapons. >> for u.s. and israel, they hinted at the fact that they would use force if they needed to ensure them is it falling into the hands of people that could be dangerous. dictators use chemical weapons. in a moment of desperation if this regime feels its back is against the wall and time is running out it may resort to the weapons. >> h
that the sandy hook tragedy was a hoax. the real purpose was to create a political environment to take away all our guns. the american public is largely on board with at least some of the president's agenda. in a new nbc news/"wall street journal" poll, more than half, 56%, say laws covering the sale of firearms should be stricter. so what realistically can the president do? david corn is washington bureau chief for "mother jones," joy reid is managing editor of thegrio.com, and both are msnbc political analysts. joy, how large should he be looking? >> i think the president needs to go in with a large package obviously, but when you talk to individual lawmakers, particularly on the house side, you get the sense two things have to happen. first of all, something has to pass the senate. that theoretically could be large, but the house is going to be a much tougher sled, although i was speaking with a couple lawmakers yesterday who seemed to think parts of what the president wants could actually pass in the house. things that are pretty much noncontroversial, things like universal background check
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
of law and having order and creating an environment where people can thrive because there is that order. but also understanding we live in a globe where we should be the leaders and have to interact. that's where our children's future are is being a part of this global economy. that's not something we can easily avoid,host: galas on the. thank you for waiting. caller: right now i see that new york's services for the mentally ill are being sanitized because of the union's and pensions -- are being sabotages because of the unions and pensions. i just want to know why pensions are being blamed for everything. i pay into my own pension. host: ok. do you have a question, or is that your statement? caller: why are pensions being blamed for the budget problems? host: thank you for the call, gail. guest: i do not think pensions are being blamed, it is just a mathematical reality. when you look at budgets, obligations, there is no doubt that there are some areas and some places where we have overextended our obligations. we have promised to much. with the shift in demographics, in the financial
interest level in this environment. you have to wonder if the bank isn't holding on to your loan to maintain that high level of interest. i wonder if the might be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstances to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all the bad loans that day made during the real estate mania. host: this idea of the debt to income ratio. that was something richard cordray talked-about. this is from american hero joe. explain this issue for us. guest: this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan. we do not want people taking on loans that they cannot afford to repay. 43% is the outside level. if your mortgage debt sure other debt -- car loans, credit cards -- exceed 43% of your growth or pre-tax income, then that is too much. that is a loan that is becoming too onerous and you might have trouble repaying. anything below 43% is acceptable as a qualified mortgage. anything above that starts to get into the territory of you are not having enough
clear, natul sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric can do for you. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. charles: if you think your student loans are bad, china will now drop 250 billion dollars a year to send kids, millions of them, to universities. the goal is to have 195 million chinese college grads by the year 2020. but with the slowing economy, it seems they are going to have a whole lot of kids on their hands with big expectations and little opportunity. sounds familiar. let's get back to the markets. it's been a great year of the great migration, and what th
are very important to try to create this environment is most appropriate. that is what we are doing. there are potential risks and inflation was mentioned. we have obviously used an expansionary monetary policy and we have increased the amount of reserves that banks hold with the bad. there are some people that think that that will be inflationary. personally i don't see much evidence of that. inflation, as i mentioned, has been quite low. expectations remain anchored. private sector forecasters do not seek any inflation coming up, and in particular, we have, i believe, with all the tools that we need to undo our monetary policy stimulus and to take that away for inflation becomes a problem. so i do not believe that you can inflation is going to be a result of any of us. that being said i stability -- in terms of stability, it is well maintained. the other thing worth mentioning is financial ability. this is a difficult issue. the concern has been raised by keeping interest rates very low that the federal reserve induces people to take greater risks in their financial investments, a
's the agenda. >> one what are the things you think you can do in this environment? by the way, i talked to bankers who say, you know what, i don't know if anyone's going to trust us. first of all i'm not sure anyone did historically trusted banks. >> agreed. >> and that it may never get that much better until, frankly, the economy gets better and the unemployment picture gets better. >> i would sake exception with never. i think there have been times in the past when the banker was your friend. you knew you could go down and get a loan if you needed to buy a house. you didn't worry about whether you could qualify. you worried about, you know, what house you wanted to buy. those are the types we need to get back. to frankly, banking's only one part of the financial services industry. this is a very broad, very wide industry. markets are driven based on people's confidence in their future, their willingness to invest in something they think has a better future than the current times. so earning that confidence. you know, financial advisers in our industry, professionals who work with indi
, an unsafe environment, but that does not get at the issue. they have to be creative sometimes to do that. in regards to domestic violence, absolutely. here is what we can do. forgive me for saying the obvious, ncic is a wonderful thing. anything with a serial number goes in there, like a toaster. it is not necessarily a go to database to get what we want to get at. i think you are right on. those people should go into the next system right away. what we need is funding for crisis teams. a lot of times, someone needs help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we have got something. now it is the mental health e r and the offices do not have to try to be creative or drive away because there is nothing they can do. was there another question? >> i wanted to add one thing. i am not an expert in mental health. i just want to say in any comprehensive package, including appropriate funding for increased access to mental health services, and
, of states has been severely injured. we need to repair that damage. now, within the interior and environment appropriations there's money for wastewater and sewer treatment projects, things that haven to be done -- have to be done. we have to provide that money. i think we have about a billion and a half dollars to do that. certainly if we september the rogers-frelinghuysen -- if we accept the rogers-frelinghuysen amendment. and this bill is whole with that amendment which we should strongly support. there's an amendment to require -- to take away mr. frelinghuysen's effort to allow a waiver on historic preservation. well, yes, it should be done. these localities don't have that kind of money. and a lot of the revenue coming into these economies is coming from tourism. they come to see historic structures. they come to see the way that many parts of the northeast were. when we were building the foundation of this country. that money should be made available in whole with federal dollars. mr. frelinghuysen's amendment is right on point. it needs to be included. so i know i'm getting to -- i'v
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)